Royal Ascot unveil new style rules: sheer is out and hats must be 4 inches wide by Daily Telegraph

Phillip Treacy hat, £7,350, Fenwick, Dress, £3,920, Erdem, Shoes, £500, Aquazzura, Bag, £1,150, Roger Vivier 

If you thought dressing for Royal Ascot was as simple as choosing your most ostentatious hat and some wedge heels, think again. the organisers of the 305-year-event say that the average racegoer spends £300 on their outfit - meaning the event brings in £34 million to the British fashion industry.

So if this is big business, perhaps it's no surprise that there are serious style rules attached. Royal Ascot has just launched their annual style guide - a collection of looks put together to advise and inspire attendees as they start to think about what to wear with only three months to go until the five-day long June event - and whilst trousers are now allowed, don't think that means the dress code is getting more relaxed.

Hat, £1,750, Edwina Ibbotson, coat, £4,900, Erdem, shirt,  £795, Erdem, blazer, £1,165, Alexander McQueen, trousers, £495, Alexander McQueen, shoes, £425, Christian Louboutin, bag, £2,540, Marzook

The annual race meeting - which the Queen attends along with members of the Royal family - is certainly steeped in tradition, but Royal Ascot would hate for us to think that they’re stuck in the past. “We follow trends. Jumpsuits are a new staple which we’re really embracing - they’re fashion forward but work for all the Ascot enclosures," Juliet Slot, commercial director at Ascot told The Telegraph.

Trouser suits are also now allowed at Royal Ascot - but, with some style caveats.  “Trouser suits are welcome but they should be of full-length and matching colour and material," notes the official style guide. They cite a powder pink trouser suit by Alexander McQueen and a cool wide-legged, spotted jumpsuit by Sportmax, as examples, but hope to steer attendees away from the current trend for culottes.  

Hat, £1,920, Edwina Ibbotson, Sportmax jumpsuit, £595, Fenwick, shoes, £295, Red Valentino, bag, £460, Red Valentino

Another current trend which is causing Ascot's style police something of a commotion are dresses by Self-Portrait which tend to come in chic longer lengths but flout the rules with revealing sheer lace panels. So if you were planning to use a day at the races as an excuse to purchase one of Han Chong’s uber-successful designs then you may have to await a wedding invitation instead.

But if sheer is out what you *are* very much encouraged to adopt for Ascot is a bold hat - as long as it has "a solid base covering at least 4 inches of the head." The style guide - which is sponsored by Fenwick and Boss Hugo Boss- features bold hats by established milliners like Phillip Treacy as well as up-and-coming names such as Francesco Ballestrazi, each one adhering to the Royal Enclosure diktat. 

 Not that the rules put off racegoers. “We’re finding that more and more people actually want to conform to the code,” Slot says. “We don’t have enough excuses to put on our finery these days so Royal Ascot is a wonderful chance.” We hope you've been taking notes. 

by B Holt at Daily Telegraph, Click Here

The Top 7 Fall 2016 Collections of London Fashion Week by S Mower Vogue

Themes of London: dream states and surrealism versus realism and chaos. Sarah Burton brought Alexander McQueen back to London, talking about Schiaparelli. Erdem Moralioglu took us backstage on a vintage movie set. Jonathan Anderson faced the present and said, “Bring it on” to the blurring rate of change in the era of social media. Marques ‘ Almeida and Molly Goddard kept it real, casting ordinary girls for their shows.

All over five days, the viewing of fashion took people on long tramps through galleries—Tate Britain, Tate Modern, and the ICA—in and out of the grandiose landmarks of Lancaster House and the medieval Guildhall of London, and up and down the ramps of a Soho car park. History was delved into in London—the ’70s, really, mixed up with the ’30s and ’40s. Decadent nostalgia or speeding 21st-century reality? Between the both, there was still an idealistic feeling that full-on fashion and personal, meaning-filled clothes to treasure are what the world needs.

 

1. Alexander McQueen

Sarah Burton’s “sleepwalking” collection kept her audience wide-awake with a meditation that began with Schiaparelli-like “Vanity” prints and devolved into an incredible star-and-moonlight-sprinkled finale. After this, you will certainly want to find an excuse to wear a cloak—or maybe to wrap yourself in an old-time Hollywood starlet’s pink eiderdown. Bets are on that plenty of top-ranking new-time Hollywood stars will be fighting to make those dreams their reality at the Oscars.

2. Burberry

The forms, schedules, and rituals of fashion are all being thrown into question by what fashion’s pro–digital age titan, Christopher Bailey, CEO and chief creative officer of Burberry, is about to do in September. In the midst of the buildup to the cataclysmic day he will switch the company to immediate delivery of the runway collection, it was reassuring to feel a gentler, more humanizing tack being taken with both his clothes and his lower-key presentation style. Making Burberry relatable and fizzing with item excitement is his task now. He got off on the right foot with the short, slightly ’60s vintage-y sequined dresses and lozenge-pattern metallic brocades, and at least one great, tweedy coat with fringes sprouting at the shoulder, for Fall. Oh, wait! There will be another Fall collection in September . . . will it compete with this one in the stores

 

3. J.W.Anderson

Jonathan Anderson messed about with all kinds of wavy, ruffly, and curved short skirts and dresses in the search, he said, “for modern cocktailwear.” The footwear was great: kitten-heeled pointy shoes with built-in plastic spats that were dotted with diamante, and square-toed boots smothered with iridescent “feathers,” or a third with tubular steel heels. Irrational as they are, they defy the pragmatic and pedestrian and go straight to the top of the wanted list.

4. Simone Rocha

Simone Rocha’s post-baby collection had more range and female intensity than ever. Within it, she had pink, lilac, gold, and red net and crocheted lace ankle-skimming dresses, soft coats, and a hint of the macabre Victoriana black, which is rising this season. Plus a closetful of stoles, furry bags, drippy plastic bead earrings, and her signature Lucite-heel shoes.

5. Erdem

Erdem Moralioglu’s cinematic imagination scripted a theater or movie audition sometime in the ’30s or ’40s. Enter stage left, ingenues hoping for their big break. Competing outstanding performances: dark metallic sequins cut into a cape and midi skirt, and the gunmetal pailletted bias-cut dress with a swish in the hem.

 

Roksanda Ilincic’s soft-but-chic collection was a delight for grown-ups to rest their eyes on, catching the vaguely ’70s vibes of the season without being costumey. Plaudits for her rich color palette—contrasts of pink and teal, plum and ginger—for the way she resolved a definitive frill-necked blouse, edged in contrasting piping and tied with a velvet bow, and for the first glimpse of her bags.

7. Marques ‘ Almeida

The radical thing about this collection is that it started with Marta Marques and Paulo Almeida pinning up pictures of their own friends and creating looks for them, which the friends then wore in the show. The intention was to interrupt their usual “full look” practice and let in a more “real” and spontaneous way of styling. It still really looked like fashion, though: the oversize gingham extra-long-sleeve shirts, the bright hoodie dresses, the enormously puffy puffas—a lot to add to the designers’ core repertoire of shredded-edge denim, which this season runs to jumbo-size wide-leg jeans. That last is a trend to clock, too.

 

Things Science Says Will Make You Much Happier by T Bradbury

It’s no secret that we’re obsessed with happiness. After all, the “pursuit of happiness” is even enshrined in the Declaration of Independence. But happiness is fleeting. How can we find it and keep it alive?

Psychologists at the University of California have discovered some fascinating things about happiness that could change your life.

Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky is a psychology professor at the Riverside campus who is known among her peers as “the queen of happiness.” She began studying happiness as a grad student and never stopped, devoting her career to the subject.

One of her main discoveries is that we all have a happiness “set point.” When extremely positive or negative events happen—such as buying a bigger house or losing a job—they temporarily increase or decrease our happiness, but we eventually drift back to our set point.

The breakthrough in Dr. Lyubomirsky’s research is that you can make yourself happier—permanently. Lyubomirsky and others have found that our genetic set point is responsible for only about 50% of our happiness, life circumstances affect about 10%, and a whopping 40% is completely up to us. The large portion of your happiness that you control is determined by your habits, attitude, and outlook on life.

"Happiness depends upon ourselves." -Aristotle

Even when you accomplish something great, that high won’t last. It won’t make you happy on its own; you have to work to make and keep yourself happy.

Your happiness, or lack thereof, is rooted in your habits. Permanently adopting new habits—especially those that involve intangibles, such as how you see the world—is hard, but breaking the habits that make you unhappy is much easier.

There are numerous bad habits that tend to make us unhappy. Eradicating these bad habits can move your happiness set point in short order.

Immunity to awe. Amazing things happen around you every day if you only know where to look. Technology has exposed us to so much and made the world so much smaller. Yet, there’s a downside that isn’t spoken of much: exposure raises the bar on what it takes to be awestricken. And that’s a shame, because few things are as uplifting as experiencing true awe. True awe is humbling. It reminds us that we’re not the center of the universe. Awe is also inspiring and full of wonder, underscoring the richness of life and our ability to both contribute to it and be captivated by it. It’s hard to be happy when you just shrug your shoulders every time you see something new.

Isolating yourself. Isolating yourself from social contact is a pretty common response to feeling unhappy, but there’s a large body of research that says it’s the worst thing you can do. This is a huge mistake, as socializing, even when you don’t enjoy it, is great for your mood. We all have those days when we just want to pull the covers over our heads and refuse to talk to anybody, but the moment this becomes a tendency, it destroys your mood. Recognize that when unhappiness is making you antisocial, you need to force yourself to get out there and mingle. You’ll notice the difference right away.

Blaming. We need to feel in control of our lives in order to be happy, which is why blaming is so incompatible with happiness. When you blame other people or circumstances for the bad things that happen to you, you’ve decided that you have no control over your life, which is terrible for your mood.

Controlling. It’s hard to be happy without feeling in control of your life, but you can take this too far in the other direction by making yourself unhappy through trying to control too much. This is especially true with people. The only person you can control in your life is you. When you feel that nagging desire to dictate other people’s behavior, this will inevitably blow up in your face and make you unhappy. Even if you can control someone in the short term, it usually requires pressure in the form of force or fear, and treating people this way won’t leave you feeling good about yourself.

Criticizing. Judging other people and speaking poorly of them is a lot like overindulging in a decadent dessert; it feels good while you’re doing it, but afterwards, you feel guilty and sick. Sociopaths find real pleasure in being mean. For the rest of us, criticizing other people (even privately or to ourselves) is just a bad habit that’s intended to make us feel better about ourselves. Unfortunately, it doesn’t. It just creates a spiral of negativity.

Complaining. Complaining is troubling, as well as the attitude that precedes it. Complaining is a self-reinforcing behavior. By constantly talking—and therefore thinking—about how bad things are, you reaffirm your negative beliefs. While talking about what bothers you can help you feel better, there’s a fine line between complaining being therapeutic and it fueling unhappiness. Beyond making you unhappy, complaining drives other people away.

Impressing. People will like your clothes, your car, and your fancy job, but that doesn’t mean they like you. Trying to impress other people is a source of unhappiness, because it doesn’t get to the source of what makes you happy—finding people who like you and accept you for who you are. All the things you acquire in the quest to impress people won’t make you happy either. There’s an ocean of research that shows that material things don’t make you happy. When you make a habit of chasing things, you are likely to become unhappy because, beyond the disappointment you experience once you get them, you discover that you’ve gained them at the expense of the real things that can make you happy, such as friends, family, and taking good care of yourself.

Negativity. Life won’t always go the way you want it to, but when it comes down to it, you have the same 24 hours in the day as everyone else. Happy people make their time count. Instead of complaining about how things could have been or should have been, they reflect on everything they have to be grateful for. Then they find the best solution available to the problem, tackle it, and move on. Nothing fuels unhappiness quite like pessimism. The problem with a pessimistic attitude, apart from the damage it does to your mood, is that it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: if you expect bad things, you’re more likely to get bad things. Pessimistic thoughts are hard to shake off until you recognize how illogical they are. Force yourself to look at the facts, and you’ll see that things are not nearly as bad as they seem.

Hanging around negative people. Complainers and negative people are bad news because they wallow in their problems and fail to focus on solutions. They want people to join their pity party so that they can feel better about themselves. People often feel pressure to listen to complainers because they don’t want to be seen as callous or rude, but there’s a fine line between lending a sympathetic ear and getting sucked into their negative emotional spirals. You can avoid getting drawn in only by setting limits and distancing yourself when necessary. Think of it this way: If a person were smoking, would you sit there all afternoon inhaling the second-hand smoke? You’d distance yourself, and you should do the same with negative people. A great way to set limits is to ask them how they intend to fix their problems. The complainer will then either quiet down or redirect the conversation in a productive direction.

You should strive to surround yourself with people who inspire you, people who make you want to be better, and you probably do. But what about the people who drag you down? Why do you allow them to be a part of your life? Anyone who makes you feel worthless, anxious, or uninspired is wasting your time and, quite possibly, making you more like them. Life is too short to associate with people like this. Cut them loose.

Comparing your own life to the lives people portray on social media.The Happiness Research Institute conducted the Facebook Experiment to find out how our social media habits affect our happiness. Half of the study’s participants kept using Facebook as they normally would, while the other half stayed off Facebook for a week. The results were striking. At the end of the week, the participants who stayed off Facebook reported a significantly higher degree of satisfaction with their lives and lower levels of sadness and loneliness. The researchers also concluded that people on Facebook were 55% more likely to feel stress as a result.

The thing to remember about Facebook and social media in general is that they rarely represent reality. Social media provides an airbrushed, color-enhanced look at the lives people want to portray. I’m not suggesting that you give up social media; just take it sparingly and with a grain of salt.

Neglecting to set goals. Having goals gives you hope and the ability to look forward to a better future, and working towards those goals makes you feel good about yourself and your abilities. It’s important to set goals that are challenging, specific (and measurable), and driven by your personal values. Without goals, instead of learning and improving yourself, you just plod along wondering why things never change.

Giving in to fear. Fear is nothing more than a lingering emotion that’s fueled by your imagination. Danger is real. It’s the uncomfortable rush of adrenaline you get when you almost step in front of a bus. Fear is a choice. Happy people know this better than anyone does, so they flip fear on its head. They are addicted to the euphoric feeling they get from conquering their fears.

When all is said and done, you will lament the chances you didn’t take far more than you will your failures. Don’t be afraid to take risks. I often hear people say, “What’s the worst thing that can happen to you? Will it kill you?” Yet, death isn’t the worst thing that can happen to you. The worst thing that can happen to you is allowing yourself to die inside while you’re still alive.

Leaving the present. Like fear, the past and the future are products of your mind. No amount of guilt can change the past, and no amount of anxiety can change the future. Happy people know this, so they focus on living in the present moment. It’s impossible to reach your full potential if you’re constantly somewhere else, unable to fully embrace the reality (good or bad) of the very moment. To live in the moment, you must do two things:

1) Accept your past. If you don’t make peace with your past, it will never leave you and it will create your future. Happy people know that the only good reason to look at the past is to see how far you’ve come.

2) Accept the uncertainty of the future, and don’t place unnecessary expectations upon yourself. Worry has no place in the here and now. As Mark Twain once said,

“Worrying is like paying a debt you don’t owe.”

Bringing It All Together

We can’t control our genes, and we can’t control all of our circumstances, but we can rid ourselves of habits that serve no purpose other than to make us miserable.

What makes you happy? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below, as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book,Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world's leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies. His bestselling books have been translated into 25 languages and are available in more than 150 countries. Dr. Bradberry has written for, or been covered by, Newsweek, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, andThe Harvard Business Review.

It’s no secret that we’re obsessed with happiness. After all, the “pursuit of happiness” is even enshrined in the Declaration of Independence. But happiness is fleeting. How can we find it and keep it alive?

Psychologists at the University of California have discovered some fascinating things about happiness that could change your life.

Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky is a psychology professor at the Riverside campus who is known among her peers as “the queen of happiness.” She began studying happiness as a grad student and never stopped, devoting her career to the subject.

One of her main discoveries is that we all have a happiness “set point.” When extremely positive or negative events happen—such as buying a bigger house or losing a job—they temporarily increase or decrease our happiness, but we eventually drift back to our set point.

The breakthrough in Dr. Lyubomirsky’s research is that you can make yourself happier—permanently. Lyubomirsky and others have found that our genetic set point is responsible for only about 50% of our happiness, life circumstances affect about 10%, and a whopping 40% is completely up to us. The large portion of your happiness that you control is determined by your habits, attitude, and outlook on life.

"Happiness depends upon ourselves." -Aristotle

Even when you accomplish something great, that high won’t last. It won’t make you happy on its own; you have to work to make and keep yourself happy.

Your happiness, or lack thereof, is rooted in your habits. Permanently adopting new habits—especially those that involve intangibles, such as how you see the world—is hard, but breaking the habits that make you unhappy is much easier.

There are numerous bad habits that tend to make us unhappy. Eradicating these bad habits can move your happiness set point in short order.

Immunity to awe. Amazing things happen around you every day if you only know where to look. Technology has exposed us to so much and made the world so much smaller. Yet, there’s a downside that isn’t spoken of much: exposure raises the bar on what it takes to be awestricken. And that’s a shame, because few things are as uplifting as experiencing true awe. True awe is humbling. It reminds us that we’re not the center of the universe. Awe is also inspiring and full of wonder, underscoring the richness of life and our ability to both contribute to it and be captivated by it. It’s hard to be happy when you just shrug your shoulders every time you see something new.

Isolating yourself. Isolating yourself from social contact is a pretty common response to feeling unhappy, but there’s a large body of research that says it’s the worst thing you can do. This is a huge mistake, as socializing, even when you don’t enjoy it, is great for your mood. We all have those days when we just want to pull the covers over our heads and refuse to talk to anybody, but the moment this becomes a tendency, it destroys your mood. Recognize that when unhappiness is making you antisocial, you need to force yourself to get out there and mingle. You’ll notice the difference right away.

Blaming. We need to feel in control of our lives in order to be happy, which is why blaming is so incompatible with happiness. When you blame other people or circumstances for the bad things that happen to you, you’ve decided that you have no control over your life, which is terrible for your mood.

Controlling. It’s hard to be happy without feeling in control of your life, but you can take this too far in the other direction by making yourself unhappy through trying to control too much. This is especially true with people. The only person you can control in your life is you. When you feel that nagging desire to dictate other people’s behavior, this will inevitably blow up in your face and make you unhappy. Even if you can control someone in the short term, it usually requires pressure in the form of force or fear, and treating people this way won’t leave you feeling good about yourself.

Criticizing. Judging other people and speaking poorly of them is a lot like overindulging in a decadent dessert; it feels good while you’re doing it, but afterwards, you feel guilty and sick. Sociopaths find real pleasure in being mean. For the rest of us, criticizing other people (even privately or to ourselves) is just a bad habit that’s intended to make us feel better about ourselves. Unfortunately, it doesn’t. It just creates a spiral of negativity.

Complaining. Complaining is troubling, as well as the attitude that precedes it. Complaining is a self-reinforcing behavior. By constantly talking—and therefore thinking—about how bad things are, you reaffirm your negative beliefs. While talking about what bothers you can help you feel better, there’s a fine line between complaining being therapeutic and it fueling unhappiness. Beyond making you unhappy, complaining drives other people away.

Impressing. People will like your clothes, your car, and your fancy job, but that doesn’t mean they like you. Trying to impress other people is a source of unhappiness, because it doesn’t get to the source of what makes you happy—finding people who like you and accept you for who you are. All the things you acquire in the quest to impress people won’t make you happy either. There’s an ocean of research that shows that material things don’t make you happy. When you make a habit of chasing things, you are likely to become unhappy because, beyond the disappointment you experience once you get them, you discover that you’ve gained them at the expense of the real things that can make you happy, such as friends, family, and taking good care of yourself.

Negativity. Life won’t always go the way you want it to, but when it comes down to it, you have the same 24 hours in the day as everyone else. Happy people make their time count. Instead of complaining about how things could have been or should have been, they reflect on everything they have to be grateful for. Then they find the best solution available to the problem, tackle it, and move on. Nothing fuels unhappiness quite like pessimism. The problem with a pessimistic attitude, apart from the damage it does to your mood, is that it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy: if you expect bad things, you’re more likely to get bad things. Pessimistic thoughts are hard to shake off until you recognize how illogical they are. Force yourself to look at the facts, and you’ll see that things are not nearly as bad as they seem.

Hanging around negative people. Complainers and negative people are bad news because they wallow in their problems and fail to focus on solutions. They want people to join their pity party so that they can feel better about themselves. People often feel pressure to listen to complainers because they don’t want to be seen as callous or rude, but there’s a fine line between lending a sympathetic ear and getting sucked into their negative emotional spirals. You can avoid getting drawn in only by setting limits and distancing yourself when necessary. Think of it this way: If a person were smoking, would you sit there all afternoon inhaling the second-hand smoke? You’d distance yourself, and you should do the same with negative people. A great way to set limits is to ask them how they intend to fix their problems. The complainer will then either quiet down or redirect the conversation in a productive direction.

You should strive to surround yourself with people who inspire you, people who make you want to be better, and you probably do. But what about the people who drag you down? Why do you allow them to be a part of your life? Anyone who makes you feel worthless, anxious, or uninspired is wasting your time and, quite possibly, making you more like them. Life is too short to associate with people like this. Cut them loose.

Comparing your own life to the lives people portray on social media.The Happiness Research Institute conducted the Facebook Experiment to find out how our social media habits affect our happiness. Half of the study’s participants kept using Facebook as they normally would, while the other half stayed off Facebook for a week. The results were striking. At the end of the week, the participants who stayed off Facebook reported a significantly higher degree of satisfaction with their lives and lower levels of sadness and loneliness. The researchers also concluded that people on Facebook were 55% more likely to feel stress as a result.

The thing to remember about Facebook and social media in general is that they rarely represent reality. Social media provides an airbrushed, color-enhanced look at the lives people want to portray. I’m not suggesting that you give up social media; just take it sparingly and with a grain of salt.

Neglecting to set goals. Having goals gives you hope and the ability to look forward to a better future, and working towards those goals makes you feel good about yourself and your abilities. It’s important to set goals that are challenging, specific (and measurable), and driven by your personal values. Without goals, instead of learning and improving yourself, you just plod along wondering why things never change.

Giving in to fear. Fear is nothing more than a lingering emotion that’s fueled by your imagination. Danger is real. It’s the uncomfortable rush of adrenaline you get when you almost step in front of a bus. Fear is a choice. Happy people know this better than anyone does, so they flip fear on its head. They are addicted to the euphoric feeling they get from conquering their fears.

When all is said and done, you will lament the chances you didn’t take far more than you will your failures. Don’t be afraid to take risks. I often hear people say, “What’s the worst thing that can happen to you? Will it kill you?” Yet, death isn’t the worst thing that can happen to you. The worst thing that can happen to you is allowing yourself to die inside while you’re still alive.

Leaving the present. Like fear, the past and the future are products of your mind. No amount of guilt can change the past, and no amount of anxiety can change the future. Happy people know this, so they focus on living in the present moment. It’s impossible to reach your full potential if you’re constantly somewhere else, unable to fully embrace the reality (good or bad) of the very moment. To live in the moment, you must do two things:

1) Accept your past. If you don’t make peace with your past, it will never leave you and it will create your future. Happy people know that the only good reason to look at the past is to see how far you’ve come.

2) Accept the uncertainty of the future, and don’t place unnecessary expectations upon yourself. Worry has no place in the here and now. As Mark Twain once said,

“Worrying is like paying a debt you don’t owe.”

Bringing It All Together

We can’t control our genes, and we can’t control all of our circumstances, but we can rid ourselves of habits that serve no purpose other than to make us miserable.

What makes you happy? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below, as I learn just as much from you as you do from me.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Dr. Travis Bradberry is the award-winning co-author of the #1 bestselling book,Emotional Intelligence 2.0, and the cofounder of TalentSmart, the world's leading provider of emotional intelligence tests and training, serving more than 75% of Fortune 500 companies. His bestselling books have been translated into 25 languages and are available in more than 150 countries. Dr. Bradberry has written for, or been covered by, Newsweek, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Forbes, Fast Company, Inc., USA Today, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, andThe Harvard Business Review.

If you'd like to learn how to increase your emotional intelligence (EQ), consider taking the online Emotional Intelligence Appraisal test that's included with theEmotional Intelligence 2.0 book. Your test results will pinpoint which of the book's 66 emotional intelligence strategies will increase your EQ the most.

What’s the Cost of Starting a Fashion Brand? by Alex

Technical designer: You will need to hire someone to help you communicate your designs to the factory. You could also try and do this yourself, if the factory is highly competent. If you are really clear on your design ideas, you can probably get away with having someone do two or three half days. $100-$300 per half day, total of $300-$900. (You might be able to skip this if your pattern maker works closely with you!)

Patter maker: Regardless of whether the pattern maker works directly with you or within your factory, someone will have to draft all the patterns for your collection. This is a tough one to calculate as it depends on how fast your pattern maker is, how complicated your designs are, whether you designs have repetition (ex. the same body shape for 3 dresses but in different lengths and sleeves is cheaper than 3 completely different dresses) and how well you are communicating your ideas. Let’s assume eight hours per pattern, and the pattern maker charges $30-$60 per hour. That’s a total of $4800 to $9600USD.

Work by Laura Fisher.

Work by Laura Fisher.

Fabric sourcing: You’ll need to travel to a tradeshow (unless you want to call in samples which is usually more limiting or you live in a city with fabric agents) and then you’ll need to get them to send you swatches. $1000 to $3000 if you are taking a flight to a tradeshow and staying in a hotel, up to $500USD if you are just giving out your courier account number to suppliers who are sending you swatches. Presume they won’t send them for free if you aren’t established.

Collection fabrics and finishing: You need to order fabrics to make your first prototypes and then your collection. If you presume an average of 2m of fabric per garment and you need to account for 30 samples (you’ll want more than one of a few, to showcase the different fabrics), with fabric at $10-$20USD per meter (it is always more expensive when sampling), then we are looking at $600USD to $1200USD in materials. Let’s add another $150-$300 for finishings.

Collection samples: Let’s presume you only need to make one prototype for each garment, which will require some small changes, and then you can go straight to your collection sample (of which you are making 30.) Budget around $50 for each sample (this is a ballpark, but a good one), for a total of $2500USD.

Work by Laura Fisher.

Work by Laura Fisher.

Branding: Great! You have a collection! But what about a brand name? A logo? Labels? Let’s imagine you go really basic here, you’ve got the name, you pay someone to do a simple logo ($100USD to $3000USD), and you produce a small run of labels for the clothing ($200.) Maybe you throw in some hang tags? $100USD. So count on $400USD to $3300USD for branding.

Web and Photography: Now that you have your collection, you’ll need to do some professional photos. Count on spending $300USD to $3000USD for a photographer, $250USD to $1000USD for a model, $0 to $1000USD for location, $100 to $300 for hair and makeup and $100USD to $500USD for incidentals. Then you’ve got to build a basic website and pay for hosting fees, around $750USD to $5000USD, including hosting fees for the first year. Want to do e-commerce? Add $250USD to $1000USD for a still life shoot of your collection, and $100USD to $1000USD to implement a simple webstore platform, which also has monthly fees. Social media? Try and set that up yourself for free! So count on $1850USD to $12,800USD for this section.

Business stuff: Don’t forget to register your company, open bank accounts, and do all the official stuff… What about bookkeeping and accounting? Do you need to trademark your brand name? Get a partnership agreement? Budget $500USD to $4000USD for this, depending on how bloodsucking your lawyer is. Jump up and down for joy if you have a lawyer in the family who does this, and the countless other things you need lawyers for, free.

Sales: Now that you have your collection and some really nice photos of it, you will want to show it to some buyers. The best way to do this, if you can’t get a great agent, is to do a tradeshow. A stand can cost from $1000USD to $6000USD for a new brand, then you need to set it up and decorate it, $200USD to $3000USD. Add in flights and hotels for you and your partner, you are probably looking at $2500USD to $11,000USD to attend and pay for a tradeshow with your collection and a few sales materials.

Work by Laura Fisher.

Work by Laura Fisher.

Production: Hopefully you had some orders and you are going into production! Have you graded all of your patterns? That could cost $150 to $500 per pattern. Imagine you are only going into production with 15 items, so grading costs $2250USD to $7500USD. Let’s say five stores placed orders for $3,000USD, for a total of $15,000USD for your first season (that’s pretty good!), then assume the production will cost $8,000 (margins are never great at the beginning) and you’ll want to produce some items for your webstore, so let’s say production cost $15,000. I know the stores are going to be paying you for your orders, but let’s assume you are going to use that money (which might not come until long after you have paid your factory and suppliers) to fund the second collection. Add in a few bucks ($200-$1000USD) for shipping samples or materials, and other incidentals (visiting the factory would be a good idea, too!) So count on spending from $17,450USD to $23,500USD.

Marketing: You’ve got orders and you are going to launch a web store, so now you need to do marketing. The best way to do this is to hire a PR agency. Monthly retainers can be anywhere from $500USD to $3000USD, but if that is too high, then perhaps try and do a project with an agency, allocate $1000USD to $4000UD for that, and perhaps $300USD to $1000USD to gift product to influencers. If you are brave, do it yourself, but you better hope to have great public relations skills. Marketing costs you $1300USD to $37,000USD for the first year. My experience with PR is that a good PR pays for itself, but sadly not all PRs are good.

Work by Laura Fisher.

Work by Laura Fishe

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